“After the enslaving subordination of the individual to the division of labour has vanished…”

Today, tehgraun‘s arts critics are writing about sporting events, so we have theatre critic Michael Billington on darts and rock critic Caroline Sullivan on the Second Test Match.

Tomorrow we’re promised “chief football writer Kevin McCarra on Finnish contemporary dance” and “golf correspondent Lawrence Donegan on the San Francisco Symphony’s Brahms cycle”.

I like this kind of thing.

7 thoughts on ““After the enslaving subordination of the individual to the division of labour has vanished…””

  1. I remember a swap-around that they did in the late 1980s, when for one week their critics could review anything they liked provided it was outside their usual remit.

    At least half chose to review a film, presumably because they thought it was “easy”. Most ended up writing drivel, though I did enjoy Edward Greenfield’s review of a Merchant-Ivory film – if only because it was the first time that Greenfield had set foot in a cinema in some thirty years, and was so bowled over by the improvement in sound quality (he was the paper’s record critic normally) that he devoted most of his review to the subject.

  2. I was sent a link to this yesterday, with Sullivan’s piece on the Test Match recommended, but it’s probably the worst of the lot: really, really lazy journalism. At least the others made an effort to understand why people found this interesting, or talk about the who went, where it was staged, that sort of thing, but she seems to have just decided to phone in some bored prejudices.

  3. At least the others made an effort to understand why people found this interesting, or talk about the who went, where it was staged, that sort of thing, but she seems to have just decided to phone in some bored prejudices.

    You want to try following chess. It’s not so much standard procedure as inevitable procedure.

  4. Even McCarra on contemporary Finnish dance managed a critique; it’s not as full of human suffering as watching John Terry miss a penalty. I admit, I may be biased by liking cricket.

  5. I thought the Sullivan one was shockingly lazy, and in keeping with her journalism generally (essentially, maintain the standard stereotypical view of stuff in a pleasant but uninteresting way). she’s always struck me as a very lazy journalist.

    I wonder why this sort of thing is viewed as a novelty but getting columnists who usually only write about politics to review fiction is a matter of course…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *