Ashley Mote MEP

As exceptionally long-term Stoa-readers will remember, I don’t really recognise Oxford as a part of the “South East”, but as far as elections to the European Parliament are concerned, we’re part of the “South East”, and although I do my best not to pay attention to who my MEPs are and what they’re up to, I couldn’t avoid noticing today that I’m now represented in the European Parliament by a rancid lunatic.

Ashley Mote — elected on the swivel-eyed loons ticket, but even UKIP doesn’t want anything to do with him anymore — has just signed up for the Identity, Tradition and Sovereignty grouping, which looks — at first and second glance, which is all I’ve given it so far — to be a bunch of fascists, Holocaust deniers and assorted rancid scum.

So he’ll sit in the Parliament alongside Alessandra Mussolini, a chap from the Austrian Freedom Party, two Le Pens, some Bulgarian kiddy hack, another Italian fascist (who claims his views on the Holocaust have been ‘misunderstood’, diddums), and various Romanian nationalists and Flemish separatists.

The Bodleian’s got one of his books: I’ll have a look at it soon.

Yuck.

0 thoughts on “Ashley Mote MEP”

  1. Also in the grouping are the delightfully named ‘National Union Attack’ of Bulgaria, a party known best for its misogynistic and racist comments about Roma MEPs…

  2. I normally think of Oxford as West Midlands. Though I know that’s not terribly accurate either, it doesn’t really seem obviously in any of the normal regions.

  3. Oh, I meant an hour and a half. You see, I don’t know how to get anywhere!

    At least I know that Nottingham is in Nottinghamshire. People ask me all the time what county Nottingham’s in, and then they feel really silly.

  4. I think that not so long ago the county line between Oxfordshire and Berkshire followed the river in this part of the world, so the bits of Oxford south of Folly Bridge were part of Berkshire. But I may be wrong.

  5. A copy of a 400+ page 1972 tome called Socialism Since Marx recently came into my possesion. It’s author’s name is Robert Kilroy-Silk.

  6. At least I know that Nottingham is in Nottinghamshire. People ask me all the time what county Nottingham’s in, and then they feel really silly.

    Of course, administratively speaking Nottingham isn’t in fact in Nottinghamshire, having become a unitary authority in the last round of local government reforms.

  7. Is there another Nottingham within walking distance of Dover?

    I only ask because there’s a notorious bit of Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves where Kevin Costner arrives back in his native Blighty and tells his friend that they’ll be “in Nottingham by nightfall”, despite having no visible means of transport other than their legs.

    But perhaps this is the same parallel universe where Oxford is half an hour from London.

  8. I don’t know: if Dick Turpin can do London to York overnight on Black Bess, then I don’t see why Robin Hood couldn’t do Dover to Nottingham in the daytime, esp. if played by Kevin Costner.

  9. “Any good?”

    Oh I’m not going to read it.

    Alright, I’ve flicked through without finding much of note, except that RKS doesn’t think much of Herbert Marcuse. Which I’m sure was reciprocated at the time, since I suppose Macuse was dead before RKS’ greatest achievements.

  10. there’s a notorious bit of Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves where Kevin Costner arrives back in his native Blighty and tells his friend that they’ll be “in Nottingham by nightfall”, despite having no visible means of transport other than their legs.

    That’s actually a really good film, as long as you fast-forward through any bits that don’t feature Alan Rickman. I haven’t seen the ending, since I tend to switch it off after the Sheriff dies, but I understand I’m not missing much.

  11. DC — read the preface and/or acknowledgements. Read what he says about his wife, or perhaps his kids, and report back to us. I read that many years ago and have been too lazy to recover it since his notoriety, but at the time it struck me as quite unpleasant (if I’m remembering correctly).

  12. After thanking Jean Blondel and attributing mistakes to “Adam Smith’s ‘divine providence'”, Kilroy says:

    “It is customary for authors in a preface to thank their wives and their families for their practical help, their forebearance and their sympathy. I, too, have recieved all of these. But this book was written in spite of the distractions posed by my wife, nine dogs, two cats and two boisterous children.”

  13. I think that not so long ago the county line between Oxfordshire and Berkshire followed the river in this part of the world

    They’d be able to tell you at the Central Library. For what it’s worth, if the Berkshire House pub on Abingdon Road is still there, I believe it’s so named because the county boundary ran very close to there.

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