Comments for The Virtual Stoa http://virtualstoa.net Chris Brooke's Weblog Fri, 20 Mar 2015 16:48:52 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Charing Cross Road (revisited) by Dan Gordon http://virtualstoa.net/2015/02/27/charing-cross-road-revisited/comment-page-1/#comment-1659797 Fri, 20 Mar 2015 16:48:52 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=4272#comment-1659797 Confirming Ashley Pomeroy’s suggestion, inevitably my answer is ‘not as good as the old one’. On the plus side, they’ve still got a good range of titles that you don’t find in most bookshops. When I was last in London I paid a visit to the new Foyles for the first time and bought both what I was looking for (‘The British in Rural France: lifestyle migration and the ongoing quest for a better way of life’ by Michaela Caroline Benson) and something found randomly while browsing the shelves (‘Crucible of Resistance: Greece, the eurozone and the world economic crisis’ by Christos Laskos and Euclid Tsakalatos). They also still stock my book! However the general atmosphere is too slick, corporate and Waterstones-like compared to the old Foyles: the top floor cafe gave off an indefinable whiff of irritatingness. But I also stopped off to chat to the ‘Love Activists’ homelessness campaigners who’d just been evicted from their occupation of the former Nat West Bank building on the other side of Charing Cross Road, and had a salt beef bagel at Gaby’s Deli, so it was not a wasted visit altogether.

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Comment on Patrick Riley (1941-2015) by chrisbrooke http://virtualstoa.net/2015/03/11/patrick-riley-1941-2015/comment-page-1/#comment-1659715 Thu, 12 Mar 2015 15:50:42 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=4277#comment-1659715 Since there are so many Chicago people here, perhaps one further thought. I was thinking about Patrick earlier this week, as it happens. Geneviève Rousselière was here in Cambridge to give an excellent paper on the famous disagreement between Kant and Constant about telling lies to murderers, and when I heard she was off to be Assistant Professor at Wisconsin-Madison, I thought how excellent it was that the Madison tradition of taking Rousseau seriously was being renewed.

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Comment on Patrick Riley (1941-2015) by Jennifer Pitts http://virtualstoa.net/2015/03/11/patrick-riley-1941-2015/comment-page-1/#comment-1659714 Thu, 12 Mar 2015 15:31:07 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=4277#comment-1659714 This is beautiful, Chris — thank you.

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Comment on Patrick Riley (1941-2015) by Patchen http://virtualstoa.net/2015/03/11/patrick-riley-1941-2015/comment-page-1/#comment-1659713 Thu, 12 Mar 2015 14:04:29 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=4277#comment-1659713 I’ve just heard about Patrick’s death from Sankar, who sent me here. This is beautifully done and perfectly fitting; thank you for it.

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Comment on Patrick Riley (1941-2015) by Andrew Sabl http://virtualstoa.net/2015/03/11/patrick-riley-1941-2015/comment-page-1/#comment-1659712 Thu, 12 Mar 2015 13:21:36 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=4277#comment-1659712 A lovely and touching tribute, Chris. Thanks for doing it.

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Comment on Patrick Riley (1941-2015) by John http://virtualstoa.net/2015/03/11/patrick-riley-1941-2015/comment-page-1/#comment-1659711 Thu, 12 Mar 2015 04:37:00 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=4277#comment-1659711 A much appreciated reflection on a generous and truly one of a kind man. Thank you.

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Comment on Patrick Riley (1941-2015) by josh http://virtualstoa.net/2015/03/11/patrick-riley-1941-2015/comment-page-1/#comment-1659710 Thu, 12 Mar 2015 03:00:06 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=4277#comment-1659710 Thanks so much for the lovely recollection, Chris, which so beautifully evokes Patrick.
Incidentally, the story of your Cambridge Companion chapter was the first thing I heard about Patrick — and it was an apt introduction to the man. The remarkable thing about him, I think, was that one would expect (well, I would, but perhaps this says more about me) benevolence applied universally to grow rather thin — but he managed to be intensely as well as widely benevolent.
(And, for what it’s worth, over the last few years he described himself to me as a “left Kantian”; but then he also applied that label to Marx, so it seems to cover a fair amount of ground.)

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Comment on Charing Cross Road (revisited) by chrisbrooke http://virtualstoa.net/2015/02/27/charing-cross-road-revisited/comment-page-1/#comment-1659611 Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:48:43 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=4272#comment-1659611 Is the new Foyles any good, incidentally? I haven’t yet been.

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Comment on Charing Cross Road by chrisbrooke http://virtualstoa.net/2002/07/12/78857561/comment-page-1/#comment-1659610 Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:47:24 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=201#comment-1659610 Thanks so much for this. So that more people will see this interesting comment, I’ve reposted it (and the original post) on the front page of the blog. I hope that’s OK.

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Comment on Charing Cross Road by Ashley Pomeroy http://virtualstoa.net/2002/07/12/78857561/comment-page-1/#comment-1659601 Thu, 26 Feb 2015 20:21:11 +0000 http://virtualstoa.net/?p=201#comment-1659601 2002. Thirteen years ago although my instinct is that 2002 was only three years ago. Google brought me here while I was writing a blog post of my own; thirteen years later Charing Cross road is still clinging on, although it seems in terrible shape.

The Crossrail extension has transformed the northern end of it into a building site and post-2002 the rents skyrocketed, and a lot of the shops have either closed or seem to have been gutted spiritually.

It’s interesting because I’m nostalgic for the Charing Cross Road that Chris Brooke gave up on. I fondly remember the large Borders and the shops selling used synths and DJ gear and guitars; but even then I remember thinking that the new-fangled internet and eBay was going to wipe them out, and nothing since 2002 has convinced me that there is a future in used bookshops in central London, or any shops apart from shoe shops.

But as this post suggests, Charing Cross road has been in decline forever. I wonder if people in the 1980s were convinced that Charing Cross road’s heyday was the 1960s? And perhaps people in the 1960s fondly recalled the 1930s, etc forever.

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